Veterinary Drug Handbook (VDH) is the reference veterinarians turn to when they want an independent source of information on the drugs that are used in veterinary medicine today.


Doses - PREDNISOLONE, PREDNISOLONE SODIUM SUCCINATE, PREDNISOLONE ACETATE, PREDNISONE

Dogs:

For adjunctive therapy of endotoxemic or septic shock:
a) Prednisolone sodium succinate: 5.5 - 11 mg/kg IV; may repeat in 1, 3, 6, or 10 hours.(Jenkins 1985)
For adjunctive treatment of neoplasms:
Note: Also see the section on Chemotherapy Protocols for Treatment of Neoplastic Diseasesin Small Animals found in the appendix.
a) Brain tumors (palliative therapy): Prednisone 0.5 - 1 mg/kg PO once a day to everyother day. (Fenner 1988); Prednisone 0.5 - 1 mg/kg PO bid for several days, then decrease dosage over the next week or month, dependent on patient's needs. (LeCouteurand Turrel 1986)
b) For adjunctive therapy in canine lymphomas:
COAP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside, prednisone) protocol:
Prednisone: 50 mg/m2 PO every day for one week, then 25 mg/m2 every other day.
COP (no cytosine arabinoside) protocol: Prednisone 25 mg/m2 PO every other day.
CHOP (doxorubicin instead of cytosine arabinoside): Prednisone 25 mg/m2 PO everyother day. (Couto 1986)
c) For adjunctive therapy for multiple myeloma: Prednisone 0.5 mg/kg PO once daily.
Used with melphalan: 0.1 mg/kg PO once daily for 10 days, then 0.05 mg/kg PO oncedaily or cyclophosphamide: 1 mg/kg PO once daily (if resistance develops to melphalan). (Jenkins 1985)
d) For macroglobulinemia: Prednisone 0.5 mg/kg PO once daily. Used with chlorambucil:0.2 mg/kg PO once daily for 10 days, then 0.1 mg/kg PO once daily or cyclophosphamide: 1 mg/kg PO once daily (if resistance develops to chlorambucil).(Jenkins 1985)
For adjunctive treatment of respiratory disorders:
a) Chronic bronchitis: Prednisone 0.5 - 1 mg/kg PO once a day to every other day. (Bauer1988)
b) Allergic bronchitis: Prednisolone sodium succinate: 2 - 4 mg/kg IV or IM (do not givevia rapid IV infusion). In chronically symptomatic patient: prednisone 0.5 - 1.5mg/kg/day PO. (Bauer 1988)
c) For adjunctive therapy of collapsing trachea:
Initially, prednisolone 0.25 - 0.5 mg/kg PO bid for 7-10 days. (Prueter 1988b)
Prednisone 0.5 mg/kg PO once or twice a day. Discontinue if no improvement in oneweek. Corticosteroids must be used cautiously in this condition and rarely make a difference in the long-term outcome of therapy. (Fingland 1989)
d) For allergic (eosinophilic) bronchitis or pneumonitis: Prednisone 1 - 2 mg/kg/day divided bid-tid. Every 7-10 days decrease total steroid dose by 1/4 - 1/2 as long as signsare controlled. After 3-4 weeks every other day or every third day therapy may be attempted. (Noone 1986)
e) For adjunctive therapy of parasitic pulmonary hypersensitivities: To suppress inflammation prior to parasite elimination: Prednisolone 1 - 2 mg/kg PO divided into 2-3doses. (Noone 1986)
For adjunctive therapy in liver disorders:
Note: Because prednisone requires conversion to the active compound prednisolone by theliver, some clinicians believe that only prednisolone should be used in patients with liverdisease.
a) For cholangitis: Prednisolone 1 - 2 mg/kg PO once daily for at least 1 month. Then giveevery other day for another 2-3 months and consider discontinuing and monitoring forrelapse. (Cornelius and Bjorling 1988)
b) For chronic active hepatitis: Prednisolone 1 mg/kg PO bid; recheck in 14 days. If improved, continue at same dose for approximately 2 months, then switch to alternate dayprednisolone at 2 - 4 mg/kg PO every other day for 2-3 months. If after 14 days ofprednisolone therapy no improvement is noted, add azathioprine (2 - 2.5 mg/kg POonce a day. Recheck in 10-14 days. If improved, continue for 2-3 months. If not, reconsider the diagnosis. (Cornelius and Bjorling 1988)
c) Copper-induced hepatopathy: Prednisolone 0.5 - 1.0 mg/kg PO divided bid (usedduring acute stages). Used with chelation therapy and dietary copper restriction.(Cornelius and Bjorling 1988)
For adjunctive therapy of disorders of the gastrointestinal tract:
a) For eosinophilic colitis: Prednisolone 1 - 2 mg/kg PO for 7-10 days. Gradually decrease dose over following 3-4 weeks to a minimal dosage that will control clinicalsigns. Some cases will require additional alternate-day therapy for an another 3-4weeks. (DeNovo 1988)
b) For eosinophilic enteritis: Prednisolone 1 - 3 mg/kg PO once daily; gradually taper toevery other day dosing for maintenance. May use injectable forms if dog is vomiting ormalabsorption is severe. Therapy may be necessary for weeks to months. Do not useuntil intestinal biopsy sites are healed (usually 7-10 days). (Chiapella 1988);
Prednisone 0.5 mg/kg PO once daily initially; reduce gradually to alternate day therapy.(Hall and Twedt 1989);
Prednisolone 0.5 - 1 mg/kg bid for 5-7 days, then decrease to 0.5 mg/kg/day for 5-7days. Taper dose to alternate-day therapy as condition dictates. Additional therapy for 3-4 weeks is often necessary. Relapses can occur. (DeNovo 1986)
c) For eosinophilic colitis when dietary and parasitic infestations have been eliminated orwhen other appropriate therapy has been unsuccessful: Prednisolone 0.5 - 1 mg/kg bid;taper dose gradually over a 3-4 week period to the lowest effective dose. (Chiapella1986)
d) For plasmacytic/lymphocytic enteritis: Prednisolone 2.2 mg/kg PO divided twice dailyfor 5-10 days, then 1.1 mg/kg/day for 5-10 days. Then taper by reducing steroid dosageby 1/2 every 10-14 days until alternate-day dosage is attained or symptoms recur.(Chiapella 1988)
e) For adjunctive therapy of chronic superficial gastritis (if predominance of lymphocyteand plasma cell infiltration seen on biopsy): Prednisone 0.5 - 1.0 mg/kg PO dived bidinitially and reduced over a 3 month period to lowest, alternate-day effective dosage.(Hall and Twedt 1989)
f) Ulcerative colitis: May cause some patients' condition to worsen. Use only after anunsuccessful trial of sulfasalazine. Use with caution. Prednisolone 1 - 2 mg/kg/day POfor 5-7 days; then 0.5 mg/kg/day for an additional 5-7 days; then 0.25 - 0.5 mg/kg POevery other day for 10-14 days. Continue sulfasalzine during steroid therapy. Ifsignificant improvement is not seen within the first 7 days of therapy, steroids are tapered and discontinued more rapidly. (DeNovo 1988)
g) For food allergy or intolerance: Prednisone 0.5 mg/kg PO once daily; taper dose weeklyif clinical response dictates. Discontinue when clinical remission ensues. (Chiapella1988)
h) For adjunctive therapy of endotoxemia secondary to GDV: Prednisolone sodiumsuccinate: 11 mg/kg IV (Bellah 1988); Prednisolone sodium succinate 10 mg/kg (Orton1986)
i) For eosinophilic gastritis: Prednisone 0.5 mg/kg once daily for 1-2 weeks; graduallytaper to 0.12 mg/kg PO every other day. (Twedt and Magne 1986)
j) For adjunctive therapy of intestinal lymphangiectasia: prednisolone 2 - 3 mg/kg/day.
Once remission is attained, may taper to a maintenance dosage. Not all cases respond.(Sherding 1986)
k) For adjunctive therapy of refractory wheat-sensitive enteropathy in Irish Setters:
Prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg every 12 hours for one month. Then begin a reducing dosageschedule. (Batt 1986)
l) For dogs who respond poorly to conventional therapy (enzyme replacement, dietarymodification, vitamin supplementation, & antibiotics) for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency: Predniso(lo)ne 1 - 2 mg/kg every 12 hours for 7-14 days. May reduce over 4-6weeks as patient tolerates. (Williams 1989)
For adrenal diseases:
a) For adjunctive treatment of hypoadrenal crisis: Prednisolone sodium succinate: 4 - 20mg/kg IV over 2-4 minutes, preferably after ACTH response test is completed. IVnormal saline is usually sufficient therapy during the first hour until ACTH responsetest is completed. Prednisolone sodium succinate may be repeated in 2-6 hours ordexamethasone may be added to IV infusion at 0.05 - 0.2 mg/kg q12h. Prednisolonesodium succinate possess some mineralocorticoid activity, while dexamethasone doesnot. (Feldman 1989)
b) For glucocorticoid supplementation in chronic or subacute adrenal insufficiency:
Predniso(lo)ne 0.2 - 0.4 mg/kg PO per day. (Feldman, Schrader, and Twedt 1988)
c) For glucocorticoid supplementation if azotemia or other symptoms of glucocorticoiddeficiency result: Predniso(lo)ne 0.1 - 0.3 mg/kg PO per day. (Schrader 1986)
d) For glucocorticoid coverage before and after adrenal tumor removal: Prednisolonesodium succinate 1 - 2 mg/kg IV either at 1 hour prior to surgery or at the time ofanesthesia induction. May also add to IV fluids and administer IV during the procedure.
Repeat dosage at end of procedure; may give IM or IV. Glucocorticoid supplementationmust be maintained using an oral product (initially predniso(lo)ne 0.5 mg/kg bid, cortisone acetate 2.5 mg/kg bid, or dexamethasone 0.1 mg/kg once daily). Slowly taperto maintenance levels (predniso(lo)ne 0.2 mg/kg once a day, or cortisone acetate 0.5mg/kg bid) over 7-10 days. Should complications develop during the taper, reinitiatedoses at 5 times maintenance. Most dogs can stop exogenous steroid therapy in about 2months (based on an ACTH stimulation test). (Peterson 1986)
e) For glucocorticoid "coverage" in animals who have iatrogenic secondary adrenocorticalinsufficiency and/or HPA suppression: Animals exhibiting mild to moderate signs ofglucocorticoid deficiency: Predniso(lo)ne 0.2 mg/kg PO every other day.
For animals with HPA suppression undergoing a "stress" factor: Prednisolone sodiumsuccinate 1 - 2 mg/kg just before and after stressful events (e.g., major surgery).
Continue with lower dosages until at least 3rd post-operative day. Access to a water-soluble form of glucocorticoid should be available should animal "collapse."(Kemppainen 1986)
f) For symptoms of glucocorticoid deficiency (anorexia, diarrhea, listlessness) or in well-controlled patients receiving mitotane (Lysodren®) therapy for hyperadrenocorticism undergoing a "stress": Prednisone 2.2 mg/kg PO for 2 days, then 1 mg/kg for 2 days, then 0.5 mg/kg for 3 days, then 0.5 mg/kg every other day for one week, then stop.
Reintroduce therapy or readjust dosage should symptoms recur. (Feldman 1989)
For adjunctive or alternative medical management of hyperinsulinism:
a) Prednisone 0.5 mg/kg PO divided bid initially; increase dose as required to maintaineuglycemia. (Kay, Kruth, and Twedt 1988)
b) Prednisolone 1 mg/kg divided twice daily PO, then decrease to a minimally effectivedosage. (Lothrop 1989)
For adjunctive therapy of toxicoses:
a) For cholecalciferol toxicity: Prednisone 1 - 2 mg/kg PO bid-tid. (Grauer and Hjelle1988a)
b) For adjunctive therapy of endotoxicosis secondary to garbage or carrion ingestion:
Prednisolone sodium succinate 5 - 7 mg/kg IV every 4 hours. (Coppock and Mostrom1986)
For adjunctive therapy of reproductive disorders:
a) In bitches prone to relapse after initial therapy of eclampsia (puerperal tetany):
Prednisone 0.25 mg/kg PO once daily during lactation and slowly withdrawn. (Bartonand Wolf 1988);
Prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg bid (Russo and Lees 1986)
For adjunctive therapy of heartworm disease (considered by some clinicians to be contraindicated during treatment for routine post-adulticide therapy as pulmonary thromboses maybe promoted):
a) Prednisolone 1 - 2 mg/kg PO divided bid. Reduce dosage over next 7-14 days. (Knight1988)
b) Dogs with severe cough, hemoptysis, or extensive parenchymal involvement: Prior toadulticide therapy, prednisolone 1 - 2 mg/kg PO divided bid and tapered over a 10-14day period. (Noone 1986)
c) For pneumonitis associated with occult heartworm disease: Prednisone 1 - 2 mg/kgdaily for 3 - 5 days. After steroids are stopped, give adulticide therapy immediately.(Calvert and Rawlings 1986)
For CNS disorders:
a) For granulomatous meningoencephalitis: Prednisone: 1 - 2 mg/kg PO daily for the lifeof the patient. (Fenner 1988); prednisone 2-3 mg/kg PO divided bid for 2 weeks, thenslowly reduce dosage over several weeks; long-term therapy is recommended. (Schunk1988a)
b) For reticulosis: Prednisone: 1 - 2 mg/kg/day PO until symptoms begin to subside, thenbegin taper. Continue low-dose once a day or every other day therapy indefinitely.(Fenner 1988); Prednisone 2-3 mg/kg PO divided bid for 2 weeks, then slowly reducedosage over several weeks; long-term therapy is recommended. (Schunk 1988a);
Predniso(lo)ne: 2 mg/kg PO for 1 week, then 1 mg/kg/day for 1 week, then 0.5mg/kg/day for 1 week, then 0.5 mg/kg every other day for 1 week, then 0.25 mg/kgevery other day for 1 week, then 0.25 mg/kg every 3rd day. (Riis 1986)
c) For adjunctive therapy of hydrocephalus: For long-term management, prednisone 0.5mg/kg PO every other day may be tried. (Fenner 1988)
Prednisone 0.25 - 0.5 mg/kg PO bid; continue if improvement is noted within one weekand decrease dosage at weekly intervals to 0.1 mg/kg PO every other day eventually.
Maintain dose for at least one month. (Shores 1989)
d) For adjunctive medical therapy of intervetebral disk disease (IVD):
Cervical IVD: Prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg PO bid for 3 days, then 0.5 mg/kg once daily for3-5 days.
Thoracolumbar IVD: Prednisolone 0.5 - 1.0 mg/kg SQ or PO bid for 2-3 days, thentaper dosage over next 3-5 days. (Schunk 1988a)
e) For adjunctive therapy of spondylopathy:
Cervical:For dogs with slowly progressive course and still ambulatory, use prednisone:1 - 2 mg/kg PO divided bid initially. Gradually reduce dose every 2 weeks until reach0.5 mg/kg PO every other day.
Lumbosacral: Prednisone: 1 mg/kg PO divided bid initially. Gradually reduce dose to0.5 mg/kg PO every other day. (Schunk 1988a)
f) For adjunctive therapy of White Dog Shaker Syndrome: Prednisone 0.25 mg/kg PObid for 10 days, then once a day for 10 days, then every other day for 10 days. (Fenner1988)
g) For adjunctive therapy of generalized tremor syndrome: Predniso(lo)ne 3 m/kg each
AM for 5 days, then decreased to alternate mornings for 5 days, then begin a phasedwithdrawal of drug. May require long-term low-dose alternate day therapy. (Farrow1986)
h) For nonbacterial suppurative meningitis: After cultures are confirmed negative, prednisone 2 mg/kg for 10 days, then taper slowly over 1 month. (Fenner 1986b)
i) For adjunctive therapy of dogs diagnosed with canine wobbler syndrome with signs ofmild to moderate paraparesis, tetraparesis, or ataxia: Prednisolone 1 - 2 mg/kg twicedaily initially, decrease gradually over a 5 day period to 0.5 - 1 mg/kg on alternate days.(Trotter 1986)
For hematologic disorders:
a) For autoimmune hemolytic anemia: Prednisolone 1- 4 mg/kg PO daily divided bid. Addimmunosuppressive agent (e.g., cyclophosphamide, azathioprine) if PCV does notstabilize within 48-72 hours. May take several months to wean off drugs. (Maggio-Price 1988)
b) For adjunctive therapy of pure red blood cel aplasia (PRCA): Prednisolone 2 mg/kgdivided bid. If no increase in reticulocyte count in 2 weeks, increase to 4 mg/kg bid. Ifreticulocyte counts remain low after 4-6 weeks add cyclophosphamide (30 - 50 mg/m2on 4 consecutive days each week). Continue prednisolone. Discontinue cyclophosphamide if neutropenia or thrombocytopenia occur. If reticulocyte count increases, cyclophosphamide may be discontinued and prednisolone slowly tapered toalternate day therapy. (Weiss 1986)
c) For immune-mediated thrombocytopenia: Prednisolone 1 - 3 mg/kg PO divided bid-tid.
Do not give IM injections. If platelet count increases, prednisolone dose may be taperedby 50 per cent every 1-2 weeks. Reduction ion dose should be done slowly over severalmonths. (Johnessee and Hurvitz 1983)
For dermatologic or other immune-mediated disorders:
a) For adjunctive therapy of urticaria and angioedema: Prednisone 2 mg/kg PO or IM bid(Giger and Werner 1988)
b) For canine atopy: Predniso(lo)ne 0.5 mg/kg PO bid initially for 5-10 days, then taper tothe minimum effective alternate-day dosage. (Giger and Werner 1988)
c) For adjunctive flea allergy dermatitis: Prednisolone 1 mg/kg PO once a day for 1 week, the every other day at a minimally effective dose. (Giger and Werner 1988)
d) As an immunosuppressant for auto-immune skin diseases: Predniso(lo)ne 2.2 mg/kgbid until remission; then taper to lowest effective every other day dosage. (Giger and Werner 1988)
e) For type II (cytotoxic) hypersensitivity: Predniso(lo)ne 2 mg/kg bid. Once in remission, dosage may be reduced to a maintenance level. Other immunosuppressants may berequired. (Wilcke 1986)
f) For adjunctive therapy of urticaria, shock, and/or respiratory arrest secondary to contrastmedia hypersensitivity: Prednisolone sodium succinate 10 mg/kg IV (Walter, Feeney, and Johnston 1986)
g) For adjunctive therapy of surface pyodermas: Predniso(lo)ne 1 mg/kg/day for 5-7 days.(Ihrke 1986)
Miscellaneous Indications:
For boxer cardiomyopathy:
a) In patients not responding to antiarrhythmic agents: Prednisolone 1 mg/kg bid for 10days. (Ware and Bonagura 1986)
As an appetite stimulant:
a) Prednisolone 0.25 - 0.5 mg/kg PO every day, every other day, or intermittently asneeded. (Macy and Ralston 1989)
For adjunctive therapy of posterior uveitis:
a) Prednisolone 2.2 mg/kg once daily; gradually reduce dose as inflammation is controlled. (Swanson 1989)
For chronic, proliferative, pyogranulomatous laryngitis:
a) Prednisolone 1 mg/kg bid PO; decrease dosage weekly. (Prueter 1988a)
For eosinophilic ulcer:
a) Prednisolone 2 - 4.4 mg/kg PO once a day; for chronic cases use prednisolone 0.5 - 1.0mg/kg PO every other day (DeNovo 1988)
For adjunctive or alternate therapy for hypercalcemia:
a) Prednisolone 1 - 1.5 mg/kg PO q12h. Has a delayed onset of action and a 4-8 day duration of response. (Kruger, Osborne, and Polzin 1986)
As an anti-inflammatory in the adjunctive treatment of otitis interna:
a) Prednisone 0.25 mg/kg/day for first 5-7 days of treatment. (Neer 1988)
For adjunctive therapy of myasthenia gravis:
a) Prednisone 0.5 mg/kg/day PO. Increase in 0.5 mg/kg/day increments every 2-4 daysuntil total dose of 2 mg/kg/day is attained. After remission is achieved, gradually shift toevery other day therapy. Should patient worsen during period when prednisone dose isincreased, reduce dose and increase the intervals between dosage increases. May takeseveral weeks to see a positive response. After signs are controlled, reduce dosage every4 weeks until maintenance dose is determined. Cytotoxic drugs may be indicated shouldsymptoms not be controlled or if dosage cannot be reduced. (LeCouteur 1988)

Cats:

As an immunosuppressive agent:
a) Predniso(lo)ne: Initially 2 - 4 mg/kg daily in divided doses. Taper to alternate day, low-dose therapy as rapidly as patient allows. (Gorman and Werner 1989)
For adjunctive treatment of respiratory disorders:
a) Allergic bronchitis: Prednisolone sodium succinate: 1 - 3 mg/kg IV or IM (do not givevia rapid IV infusion). (Bauer 1988)
b) For adjunctive therapy of feline asthma: Predniso(lo)ne:1 - 2 mg/kg/day (Papich 1986);
For adjunctive emergency therapy: Prednisolone sodium succinate 50 - 100 mg IV. Fornon-emergency cases: Prednisone 5 mg PO tid initially, then rapidly decrease toalternate day use (or discontinue). (Noone 1986)
For adjunctive therapy of disorders of the gastrointestinal tract:
a) For plasmacytic/lymphocytic enteritis: Prednisolone 2.2 mg/kg PO divided twice dailyfor 5-10 days, then 1.1 mg/kg/day for 5-10 days, then taper by reducing steroid dosageby 1/2 every 10-14 days until alternate-day dosage is attained or symptoms recur.(Chiapella 1988)
b) For small intestinal inflammatory bowel disease: Prednisone 1 - 2 mg/kg/day dividedinto 2 doses. Mild to moderate cases generally will respond to the lower dosage. Ifsevere, use the higher dose and treat for 2-4 weeks or until symptoms resolve. In severecases characterized by anorexia, weight loss and chronic diarrhea, use an initial dose of4 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks. If response is good, decrease dose by 1/2 after 2 weeks andagain by 1/2 at 4 weeks. Eventually, alternate day therapy can be attained and should bemaintained for 3 months. Some cats may have drugs discontinued in 3 months or long-term alternate day (or every 3rd day dosing) may be required. (Tams 1986)
For adjunctive therapy of feline plasma cell gingivitis-pharyngitis:
a) Prednisolone 1 - 2 mg/kg PO once daily. (DeNovo, Potter, and Woolfson 1988)
For eosinophilic ulcer:
a) Prednisolone 2 - 4.4 mg/kg PO once a day; for chronic cases use prednisolone 0.5 - 1.0mg/kg PO every other day (DeNovo, Potter, and Woolfson 1988)
For adjunctive therapy of feline heartworm disease:
a) For crisis due to embolization; Prednisolone 4.4 mg/kg tid with careful IV fluid therapy.(Dillon 1986)
For dermatologic conditions:
a) For adjunctive treatment of flea allergy: Predniso(lo)ne 1 - 2 mg/kg PO q12h for 5 days, then gradually taper to alternate-day therapy (usually 1 - 2 mg/kg every other evening).(Kwochka 1986)
b) For idiopathic feline miliary dermatoses: Predniso(lo)ne 1 - 2 mg/kg PO q12h for 5-7days, then reduce gradually to alternate-day therapy at 1 - 2 mg/kg. Rarely is effectivefor long-term use. (Kwochka 1986)
c) For linear granulomas: Prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg bid initially, with taper. (Thoday 1986)
As adjunctive therapy for feline neoplasias (lymphosarcoma, acute lymphoid leukemia, mastcell neoplasms):
Note: Also see the section on Chemotherapy Protocols for Treatment of Neoplastic Diseasesin Small Animals found in the appendix.
a) 20 - 50 mg/m2 q24-48h PO, SQ or IV (Couto 1989)

Cattle:

For adjunctive therapy of cerebral edema secondary to polioencephalomalacia:
a) Prednisolone 1 - 4 mg/kg intravenously (Dill 1986)
For adjunctive therapy of aseptic laminitis:
a) Prednisolone (assuming sodium succinate salt) 100 - 200 mg IM or IV; continue therapy for 2-3 days (Berg 1986)
For glucocorticoid activity:
a) Prednisolone sodium succinate: 0.2 - 1 mg/kg IV or IM (Howard 1986)

Horses:

For adjunctive therapy of COPD:
a) Prednisolone: Initially, 600 - 800 mg IM or PO in a 450 kg horse. May be possible todecrease dose and go to alternate day dosing. Doses as low as 200 mg every other daymay be effective. (Beech 1987a)
For glucocorticoid effects:
a) Prednisolone sodium succinate:0.25 - 1 mg/kg IV, Predniso(lo)ne tablets 0.25 - 1 mg/kg
PO; Prednisolone acetate: 0.25 - 1.0 mg/kg IM or 10 - 25 mg subconjunctivally. (Robinson 1987)
Llamas:
For steroid-responsive pruritic dermatoses secondary to allergic origins:
a) Prednisone: 0.5 - 1.0 mg/kg PO initially, gradually reduce dosage to lowest effectivedose given every other day. (Rosychuk 1989)

Swine:

For glucocorticoid activity:
a) Prednisolone sodium succinate: 0.2 - 1 mg/kg IV or IM (Howard 1986)

Birds:

As an antiinflammatory:
a) Prednisolone: 0.2 mg/30 gram body weight, or dissolve one 5 mg tablet in 2.5 ml ofwater and administer 2 drops orally. Give twice daily. Decrease dosage schedule ifusing long-term. (Clubb 1986)
For treatment of shock:
a) Prednisolone sodium succinate (10 mg/ml): 0.1 - 0.2 ml/100 grams body weight.
Repeat every 15 minutes to effect. In large birds, dosage may be decreased by 1/2.(Clubb 1986)

Reptiles:

a) For shock in most species using prednisolone sodium succinate: 5 - 10 mg/kg IV asneeded. (Gauvin 1993)
Dosage Forms/Preparations/Approval Status/Withdrawal Times - Veterinary-Approved Products:
A zero tolerance of residues in milk for these compounds have been established for dairy cattle. Althese agents require a prescription (Rx). Known approved-veterinary products are indicated below.
Prednisolone Tablets 5 mg. 20 mg
Delta-Cortef® (Upjohn), Prednis-Tab® (Vet-A-Mix); generic (Rx). Approved for use indogs.
Prednisolone Acetate Suspension for Injection 25 mg/ml, 50 mg/ml, 100 mg/ml
Available under several trade names and generically.
Prednisolone Sodium Succinate for Injection (Veterinary) 20 mg/ml in 50 ml vials
Solu-Delta Cortef® (Upjohn), Sterisol-20® (Anthony), generic; (Rx) Approved for dogs, cats, and horses. Refer to the package insert for more information on dosage and preparationof the solution before using.
Prednisolone Sodium Phosphate for Injection (Veterinary) 100 mg/vial, 500 mg/vial
Cortisate-20® (Schering). Approved for IV use in dogs. Refer to the package insert for moreinformation on dosage, etc.
Prednisone Suspension for Injection (Veterinary) 10 mg/ml, 40 mg/ml; Meticorten® (Schering)
Approved for dogs, cats, and horses.

Human-Approved Products:

Prednisolone Tablets: 5 mg Delta-Cortef® (Upjohn); generic, (Rx)
Prednisone Tablets: 1 mg, 2.5 mg, 5 mg, 10 mg, 20, mg, 50 mg (Rx)Prednisolone Syrup: 15 mg/5 ml in 240 ml; Prelone® (Muro) (Rx)
Prednisone Oral Solution/Syrup: 1 mg/ml in 30 ml, 120 ml, 240 ml and 500 ml (Rx)Prednisolone Acetate Injection: 25 mg/ml, 50 mg/ml in 10 & 30 ml vials; Key-Pred 25® (Hyrex)(Rx); Predalone 50® (Forest) (Rx); Predcor-50® (Hauck) (Rx); generic