Veterinary Drug Handbook (VDH) is the reference veterinarians turn to when they want an independent source of information on the drugs that are used in veterinary medicine today.

SODIUM SULFATE, GLAUBER'S SALT

Chemistry - Sodium sulfate (hexahydrate form) occurs as large, colorless, odorless, crystals orwhite crystalline powder. It will effloresce in dry air and partially dissolve in its own water ofcrystallization at about 33°C. 1 gram is soluble in about 2.5 ml of water.

Storage, Stability, Compatibility

Store in tight containers at temperatures not exceeding 30°C.

Pharmacology - SODIUM SULFATE, GLAUBER'S SALT

When given orally, sodium sulfate acts as a saline cathartic (draws water intosmall intestine). Sodium sulfate is considered to be the most effective saline cathartic on a molarbasis. Sulfates also react with a variety of cations to form non-absorbable compounds, which mayexplain its efficacy in reducing copper loads and to reduce gut calcium.
Uses, Indications - Sodium sulfate is used as a saline cathartic, primarily in food animals.

Pharmacokinetics - SODIUM SULFATE, GLAUBER'S SALT

Sodium sulfate is not appreciably absorbed from the GI tract and thereby actsa saline cathartic. Sodium may be absorbed however, after exchanging with other cations.
Contraindications/Precautions - Saline cathartics should not be used in dehydrated animals.
Because of the drug's high sodium content, it should be used with caution in patients with severe
CHF or in patients otherwise susceptible to sodium retention.

Adverse Effects, Warnings

Diarrhea, cramping and flatulence may result. Electrolyte abnormalities may occur with chronic use.

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